Putin is laying blame on Lenin?

Putin – singled out by a British court as a “probable” orderer of the murder of Litvinenko, is now  engaging himself , among other things, in discussions about the role of Lenin in Russian history

Lenin

Vladimir Ilich Lenin

The same day that the British High Court had published its report on the murder of Alexander Litvinenko, Putin held talks with some members of the “Council for Science and Education of the President of the Russian Federation ” and discussed quite lively which educational institutions really should receive economic support from the State in the present situation .

One of those academics, head of Kurchatovsky Institute Mikhail Kovalchuk, recalled that prominent researchers have coped with scarce resources, and he – by quoting a poem by Pasternak –  first of all called for new ideas:

Then, when I saw him clearly
I thought, and wondered without end
On his initiative and the right
to  take the leadership.
The answer is: He ruled the flow of thoughts
and therefore – the whole country

/ Originally: Тогда, его увидев в яви,
я думал, думал без конца
об авторстве его и праве
дерзать от первого лица.
Ответ такой: он управлял теченьем мысли
и только потому – страной /

The poem was written in the 1920th  and was dedicated to Lenin and his role in history. Putin remarked after hearing the poem, that the flow of thoughts must be managed in a proper way, “..and not as Vladimir Ilich Lenin managed them”. According to Putin Lenin’s thoughts led “..to the collapse of the Soviet Union. He put a nuclear bomb under the building called Russia, and subsequently it was destroyed .”

These statements shook the russian society. Presidential press secretary had to comment: “.. everyone has the right to express his opinions, even the country’s president.” The communist party’s representative said he hoped that it was “… a careless word from the president.”
“Lenin can not be blamed for the atomic bomb”, someone objected.

And so Vladimir Putin had to explain what he had said about Lenin. (A statement which certainly can be worth taking a closer look at, at some point) .

Or did Putin only distract from what happened in London? A Russian-speaking critic puts it this way in a tweet:

rysk tweet

In translation:
(Someone, to Putin): – Vladimir Vladimirovich, do you agree that the use of polonium is equal to “nuclear terrorism”?
(Putin): – Why me? Look at Lenin – he was a nuclear terrorist!

 

 

The Guardian, Le Monde ,The Salt lake Tribunal, Tass